Biden 'denounces' the threat of a 'night of rage' over the expected ruling on abortion

Wednesday, White House press secretary Karine Jean-Pierre said that President Biden 'denounces' the threat by an activist group to lead a 'night of rage' if the Supreme Court takes away federal abortion rights.

A small group called Jane's Revenge suggested a night of chaos if the Supreme Court overturns the Roe v. Wade decision from 1973 and gives abortion policy back to the states, which a leaked draft ruling shows is possible.

"A group called Jane's Revenge has been passing out flyers in Washington, DC, across the country, and online. The flyers say that if Roe is overturned, there will be a night of anger, looting, burning, and rioting," Al Jazeera reporter Kimberly Halkett said at Jean-regular Pierre's press conference.

"What message does this White House have as we get closer to that decision?" Halkett asked.

Jean-Pierre said in response, "Violence and destroying property have no place in our country, no matter what." And the president is angry about this."

"These kinds of actions are wrong no matter what our politics are," Jean-Pierre said. "So we spoke out against that, and we will keep speaking out against any violence or threats."

According to White House press secretary Karine Jean-Pierre, President Biden "denounces" the proposed "night of rage" protest from an abortion right activist group if the Supreme Court overturns Roe v. Wade.
According to White House press secretary Karine Jean-Pierre, President Biden “denounces” the proposed “night of rage” protest from an abortion right activist group if the Supreme Court overturns Roe v. Wade.
EPA/MICHAEL REYNOLDS
Abortion rights activists protesting outside of the Supreme Court building on June 21, 2022.
Abortion rights activists protesting outside of the Supreme Court building on June 21, 2022.
EPA/SHAWN THEW

Last week, Biden signed a bill that makes sure Supreme Court justices and their families are safe at all times. After a draft anti-abortion rights ruling written by Justice Samuel Alito was leaked in May, protesters from the group Ruth Sent Us showed up at the homes of the court's six conservative justices. This was in response to the leak of the draft.

Nicholas Roske, who is 26 years old, is said to have called 911 on himself on June 8 and said he had a gun and a knife near the home of Justice Brett Kavanaugh in Maryland. He found the address online. He is accused of trying to kill someone.

It's not clear when the court will decide on the abortion case, which involves a challenge to a Mississippi law that bans most abortions after 15 weeks of pregnancy.

Jean-Pierre said the White House will "continue to denounce any violence or threats" ahead of the Supreme Court's potential ruling this week.
Jean-Pierre said the White House will “continue to denounce any violence or threats” ahead of the Supreme Court’s potential ruling this week.
AP Photo/Susan Walsh

On Thursday and Friday, the Supreme Court will give its decisions.

On May 30, Jane's Revenge put a message online asking for a "night of rage."

"On the night that the final decision is made—we don't know the exact date yet, but we know it's coming soon—we want brave people to come out after dark," the group said.

"We want everyone, no matter who they are or where they are, to do what they can to show how angry they are. We've decided that actions all over the country will start at 8pm, but this is just a general rule. There may be other things to think about when deciding when and where to meet.

Police gates and fencing surrounding the Supreme Court building in preparation for protests.
Police gates and fencing surrounding the Supreme Court building in preparation for protests.
Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The appeal went on to say, "To our allies who are cis men and would like to join us in the streets, we say: you are welcome, but you must use your privilege to protect and support us in a way that lets us get angry." Do not police us. Don't tell us what to do and what not to do. But help us when we need it."

If the justices do get rid of abortion rights, it's also not clear where people would riot in cities like Washington.

When Trump was president in 2020, riots and protests against police brutality were centered on the White House. But since Biden supports legal access to abortion, the executive mansion isn't an obvious target. The Supreme Court is on Capitol Hill, which is more of a suburban area, and it is surrounded by anti-riot fencing in case there is a riot.

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