Facebook is being accused by a new whistleblower of fostering hate speech and misinformation on its site

Facebook has been accused of harboring hate speech and unlawful conduct, according to a former employee of Facebook's integrity team who has turned whistleblower.

Facebook's problems do not appear to be going away anytime soon. On Facebook, a fresh whistleblower has unearthed some new information. Facebook has been accused of harboring hate speech and unlawful conduct, according to a former employee of Facebook's integrity team who has turned whistleblower. He claimed that the firm prioritizes revenues over efforts to combat hate speech. The new charges come just days after another former Facebook employee, Frances Haugen, accused the business of harming teenage users via Instagram.

The Washington Post had spoken with the latest whistleblower, who was a member of Facebook's integrity team, about her allegations. According to reports, he had lodged a complaint with the Securities and Exchange Commission. The whistleblower claimed in the complaint that Facebook was afraid of then-President Donald Trump and hence refused to enforce safety rules. Out of fear of upsetting Trump and his political allies, Facebook consistently undercut efforts to prevent hate speech and misinformation, according to the report. Facebook was also concerned that tampering with the President might stifle its expansion.

In the affidavit, one of the Facebook officials, Tucker Bounds, was also mentioned. "It'll be a flash in the pan," he reportedly stated. Some legislators will become enraged. After that, they'll go on to something new in a few weeks. Meanwhile, we're fine because we're printing money in the basement."

The new whistleblower's accusations are similar to those made by Frances Haugen, who claimed that Facebook prioritizes profit over user safety. Facebook is planning to alter its name after receiving too many accusations and public relations difficulties as a result of these claims.

According to rumours, Facebook is currently considering altering its name. Branding experts, on the other hand, believe that changing identities will not keep Facebook out of public scrutiny on the issues revealed by the whistleblowers. "Just because you rebranded, the media and regulators aren't going to stop examining or enacting reforms," Marisa Mulvihill, Prophet's head of brand and activation, told Reuters.

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