Mets coronavirus fallout: Seven pressing questions

The Mets became Major League Baseball’s latest coronavirus casualty on Thursday, when one player and one staff member tested positive for the disease, immediately resulting in the postponement of Thursday’s series finale against the Marlins in Miami as well as Friday night’s Subway Series opener against the Yankees at Citi Field. While many questions remain unanswered at this early stage, here’s what we know:

Q: Let’s start with the superficial stuff. What is the likelihood that any of this weekend’s scheduled Subway Series will be played?

A: Quite low. When only one member of the Reds tested positive on Aug. 13, Cincinnati wound up not playing for the next four days, as Major League Baseball wanted to avoid the sort of outbreaks that occurred with the Cardinals and Marlins. Four days of not playing would take the Mets through Sunday.

Q: What would the Yankees do during this time?

A: Probably hold a workout or two at Yankee Stadium. They were planning to take Friday off after getting swept by the Rays.

The Mets game versus the Yankees on Friday has been postponed.Getty Images

Q: All right, now for the more serious matters. How does this work with the Mets to avoid a spread of the virus?

A: The Mets announced Thursday that the team would fly home with the proper safety precautions, except the two positively diagnosed members as well “as those traced to be within close contact” of those two members, information obtained from contact tracing.

Q: What is “close contact”?

A: As per the Center for Disease Control guidelines, which MLB is using, “close contact” means living in the same household as someone, being within 6 feet of someone for 15 minutes or longer, or being in direct contact with secretions from a sick person with COVID-19 (like being coughed on). It does not include brief interactions like walking past someone. So as long as the Mets weren’t being stupid, very few people should have been left behind.

Q: Were the Mets being stupid?

A: An industry source told The Post’s Mike Puma that the Mets didn’t break any of the sport’s protocols.

Q: What will the next few days be like?

A: The Mets said they will test their entire traveling party, and you can expect that to happen for a few days. Word tends to get out each morning about the results from the previous days. So we should know before lunchtime every day whether the Mets have good news or bad news to share.

Q: Will we find out the identities of the two positive cases?

A: It’ll be up to the individuals, let’s hope. We haven’t yet learned the one Red whose case shut them down for four days.