Treaty banning nuclear weapons: Ratified, but not by those with atomic weapons

The 50th state, Honduras, has just ratified the treaty, allowing it to enter into force within 90 days. Sadly, it has not been signed by the main holders of the atomic weapon, including the United States, Britain, France, China and Russia.

The international treaty banning nuclear weapons has been ratified by a 50th state, Honduras, the UN announced on Saturday, allowing the entry into force in 90 days of this text that its promoters consider historic.

The ace ! The treaty has not been signed by the main holders of the atomic weapon. Pro-abolition activists still hope that its entry into force will be more than symbolic.

The Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons prohibits the use, development, production, testing, stationing, stockpiling and threat of use of such weapons. It was approved by the United Nations General Assembly in July 2017 with the support of 122 countries.
Towards a change in behavior?

Among those who have recently ratified it are Nigeria, Malaysia, Ireland, Malta, Tuvalu. After the 50th signing, the treaty is due to enter into force on January 22, 2021, the UN said.

Japan, the only country to have suffered nuclear fire, has ruled out signing the treaty for the time being and questioned its effectiveness. And major countries with nuclear weapons, including the United States, Britain, France, China and Russia, have not signed it.

Pro-abolition activists hope its ratification will have the same impact as previous international treaties banning landmines and cluster munitions: stigmatizing the possession and use of nuclear weapons, which could lead to behavior change even from non-signatory countries.

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