How U.S. states and cities are cracking down on Thanksgiving travel

New York City 

In New York City, checkpoints at bridges, tunnels and other keys crossings will have cops out 'in force' to inform travelers of the state's quarantine requirements.

Travelers into New York are required to have a negative test before arriving and then again four days into their trip; if that's negative, they can stop quarantining.

The rules don't apply to neighboring states and New Yorkers who are out-of-state for less than 24 hours only need to take a coronavirus test within four days of returning to the state.

Test and trace tests will also be out in the city to help travelers with the rules, authorities said.

Those who violate the rules face a fine of $2,000, Mayor Bill de Blasio added.  

Los Angeles

Los Angeles introduced an online form that asks air travelers to acknowledge that there is a recommendation to quarantine for 14 days.

The quarantine is not a requirement in the state, however, and the CDC has already suggested that it may shorten the quarantine time from the two weeks currently recommended to between eight and ten days. 

Chicago

Mayor Lori Lightfoot introduced a nonbinding 30-day stay-at-home advisory as she advised residents to cancel Thanksgiving plans and stay at home unless they need to go to work or school or to tend to essential needs.

Newark  

Mayor Ras Baraka has issued a stay at home order for ten days starting from Wednesday to slow the spread of the coronavirus in the state's largest city.

Vermont

Governor Phil Scott remained worried about Thanksgiving travel in Vermont Tuesday as he called for students to be interrogated about their Thanksgiving plans before being allowed back to in-person teaching.

He directed schools to as students if they had been a part of a multi-family Thanksgiving gathering, requiring those who have done so to transition to online learning for 14 days. 

Pennsylvania

In Pennsylvania, Gov. Tom Wolf announced that law enforcement would be stepping up efforts to enforce the state's safety plan, which requires people entering from a different state - whether Pennsylvania residents or not - to test negative for the virus within 72 hours before they arrive in the commonwealth.

 As well as imploring residents to forgo large gatherings, Gov. Wolf has introduced a one-night shutdown of alcohol sales for in-person consumption at places like bars and restaurants. The shutoff will begin at 5pm on Wednesday.

Maryland

Gov. Larry Hogan has introduced 'High Visibility Compliance Units' which will send out state troopers to patrol near bars, restaurants and event venues to crack down on any public gatherings.   

New Mexico

Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham announced in a Twitter post that the state will 'hit reset' and a statewide stay-at-home order began on November 16 to discourage travel.

New Mexicans were instructed to shelter in place and stay at home apart from essential trips. All non-essential and non-profit business were forced to close their in-person activities.

Minnesota

Gov. Tim Walz announced a blanket ban on social gatherings

'Except as specifically permitted in this Executive Order, social gatherings are prohibited,' the Walz executive order says. 

Oregon

Governor Kate Boren has also announced a 'two-week' freeze on most activities and nonessential businesses across the state. 

Washington

Gov. Jay Inslee ordered a one-month ban on indoor services at restaurants and gyms and reduced in-store retail capacity to 25 percent.

Michigan

Gov. Gretchen Whitmer issued a ban on in-person high school and college classes, as well as indoor dining service for three weeks, as she hoped to keep people at home over Thanksgiving.

Rhode Island

Gov. Gina Raimondo called for a 'two-week pause' with businesses closures and reduced restaurant capacity. The pause will be reviewed on December 13 when the state may go into a further lockdown.

THANKSGIVING TRAVEL IN NUMBERS: 

AIR: 

Six million people flew in the six days before Thanksgiving, according to TSA figures. 

CAR:

48 million Americans will travel by car between Wednesday and Sunday, AAA says.  

TRAIN/BUS: 

350,000 will travel by train between today and Sunday, according to AAA forecasts. 

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