George Floyd's brother will 'testify before Congress in the first House hearing on police brutality after the cop-killing'

Philonise Floyd, the brother of George Floyd, will reportedly testify before the House Judiciary Committee this week The committee hearing scheduled for Wednesday is the first on police brutality since the cop-related slaying of Floyd in Minneapolis on Memorial Day   Lawmakers at the hearing will examine racial profiling, police brutality the loss of trust between …

  • Philonise Floyd, the brother of George Floyd, will reportedly testify before the House Judiciary Committee this week
  • The committee hearing scheduled for Wednesday is the first on police brutality since the cop-related slaying of Floyd in Minneapolis on Memorial Day  
  • Lawmakers at the hearing will examine racial profiling, police brutality the loss of trust between police and their communities around the country
  • The hearing will follow a package of police reforms expected to be introduced by House Democrats on Monday
  • Democrats want to pass legislation by the time the House returns for a round of votes in about three weeks

Philonise Floyd, the brother of George Floyd, will reportedly testify before the House Judiciary Committee this week. 

The committee hearing scheduled for Wednesday will be the first on police brutality after the cop-related slaying of Floyd in Minneapolis on Memorial Day. 

The hearing will follow a package of police reforms House Democrats are expected to introduce Monday. 

Philonise Floyd, the brother of George Floyd, will reportedly appear before Congress to testify before the House Judiciary Committee this week. The brother ispeaking at a memorial for F

Philonise Floyd, the brother of George Floyd, will reportedly appear before Congress to testify before the House Judiciary Committee this week. The brother is pictured speaking at a memorial for Floyd on Thursday

The brother will appear at the first Congressional committee on police brutality Wednesday since the cop-related slaying of Floyd (pictured) in Minneapolis on Memorial Day

The brother will appear at the first Congressional committee on police brutality Wednesday since the cop-related slaying of Floyd (pictured) in Minneapolis on Memorial Day

It was not known how the brother will appear before lawmakers on Capitol Hill, reports ABC News, which learned about his appearance at the hearing from congressional sources.

The House has set up new guidelines for how it will hold hearings in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic. The hearing will include people in attendance and some who will attend virtually, an aide tells ABC.

Social distancing is also expected on Capitol Hill. 

‘There are now protests taking place in every state as people take a stand against police brutality and racism,’ House Judiciary Chairman Jerry Nadler said in a statement announcing the hearing.

‘People are rightfully upset, they are frustrated, and they want to be heard. They want real change, not meaningless words. I want Americans to know that I hear them, and I see them,’ says the Democratic congressman from New York. 

Nadler adds that the committee hearing will ‘examine the crisis of racial profiling, police brutality and lost trust between police departments and the communities they serve.’  

House Judiciary Chairman Jerry Nadler noted there are now protests over George Floyd's killing in 'every state as  people take a stand against police brutality and racism.' He is pictured calling for a ban on police choke holds in New York earlier this week

House Judiciary Chairman Jerry Nadler noted there are now protests over George Floyd’s killing in ‘every state as  people take a stand against police brutality and racism.’ He is pictured calling for a ban on police choke holds in New York earlier this week

Nadler says, 'People are rightfully upset, they are frustrated, and they want to be heard.' Protesters calling for an end to police brutality are pictured near Capitol Hill Saturday

Nadler says, ‘People are rightfully upset, they are frustrated, and they want to be heard.’ Protesters calling for an end to police brutality are pictured near Capitol Hill Saturday

Democrats want to pass legislation by the time the House returns for a round of votes in about three weeks. 

Floyd, a 46-year-old black man, died on May 25 in Minneapolis after white police officer Derek Chauvin, who has been charged with murder, put his knee on Floyd’s neck for several minutes as he lay handcuffed on the pavement, gasping that he couldn’t breathe. 

The arrest followed days of nationwide protests and riots demanding his arrest, after he was caught on video kneeling on Floyd’s neck while arresting him for allegedly trying to use a counterfeit $20 bill at a deli. 

Floyd, a 46-year-old black man, died on May 25 in Minneapolis after white police officer Derek Chauvin (pictured), who has been charged with murder, put his knee on Floyd's neck for several minutes as he lay handcuffed on the pavement, gasping that he couldn't breathe

Floyd, a 46-year-old black man, died on May 25 in Minneapolis after white police officer Derek Chauvin (pictured), who has been charged with murder, put his knee on Floyd’s neck for several minutes as he lay handcuffed on the pavement, gasping that he couldn’t breathe

Hollywood celebrities, musicians and politicians gathered in front of Floyd’s golden casket on Thursday at a sanctuary at North Central University in the first of a series of memorials set for three cities over six days. 

Among the tributes, Philonise Floyd on Thursday held a prayer vigil at the site where his sibling was killed. 

‘Everyone wants justice for George, we want justice for George,’ he told the crowd. ‘He’s going to get it.’ 

In New York City, Floyd’s other brother, Terrence, addressed a crowd gathered at a memorial rally in Cadman Plaza in Brooklyn.

In New York City, Floyd's other brother, Terrence, addressed a crowd gathered at a memorial rally in Cadman Plaza in Brooklyn. The brother is pictured speaking at the event

In New York City, Floyd’s other brother, Terrence, addressed a crowd gathered at a memorial rally in Cadman Plaza in Brooklyn. The brother is pictured speaking at the event

‘At the end of the day, my brother’s gone, but the Floyd name lives on,’ Terrence said. 

‘I’m just thankful when I hear about the memorials going on. I hear they’re going on all over the world.’  

Thousands of protesters that same day took to the streets in Washington DC, Atlanta, Philadelphia, Chicago, New Orleans, Houston, Los Angeles, Seattle and many other cities holding signs with Floyd’s image and powerful messages including ‘Enough’, ‘I Can’t Breathe’ and ‘Black Lives Matter’.

Many of the demonstrations continued after nightfall, resulting in a few scattered arrests in cities where curfews remain in place to prevent violence and looting seen on previous nights.

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